The Status Now Network (SNN) is looking for a Network Development Coordinator

Updated 8 December 2021: The deadline for our receipt of applications has been extended.

26 October 2021: Status Now Network (SNN), a coalition of almost 140 migrant and refugee solidarity organisations, has a vacancy for the post of Network Development Coordinator.

SNN is campaigning across the UK for the regularisation and Indefinite Leave to Remain of migrants and refugees who currently have a precarious residence status. It is migrant and refugee-led and works through public education and participatory action research projects which aim to establish precarious migrant residence status – as an access to human rights and social justice issue – across the areas of housing, employment, health, family welfare and race equality.

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Ireland: MASI welcomes the decision by the minister to offer once in a generation Amnesty for 17000 undocumented migrants

Updated 3 December 2021: Lucky Kambule from StatusNow4All signatory organisation MASI – Movement of Asylum Seekers in Ireland:

Movement of Asylum Seekers in Ireland – MASI welcome the announcement by the Minister for Justice in Ireland, Minister Helen McEntee to regularise 17000 people including 3000 children.

MASI also welcomes inclusion of the people who seek international protection (Asylum Seekers) and have been in the system for two years and more. The inclusion of the people under threat of deportation also shows the inclusive approach being taken by the Minister, to include as many people as she possibly can.

It is comforting to see that the report by Catherine Day (see below) has informed some of these decisions.

The mood has suddenly changed for many people who have been stuck in direct provision for so long.  Everyone is happy and sees this as an early Christmas present .”

RTE: Government scheme to regularise thousands of undocumented migrants

The Government has approved a scheme to regularise thousands of undocumented migrants and their families who are living in Ireland.

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EDM #7 – Regularisation of undocumented migrants

StatusNow4All welcomes the following EDM #7, and we remind readers of EDM #1442: https://statusnow4all.org/edm-1442-undocumented-migrants-and-covid-19-vaccination/

EDM #7: That this House recognises that there are many barriers that prevent people from accessing and maintaining stable immigration status even when they were either born in the UK or have lived in the UK for many years; further recognises that the majority of undocumented migrants have lost their status through no fault of their own, including through an inability to pay application fees, lack of access to legal advice, mistakes on the part of decision-makers and complexity of immigration rules; understands that the harm done to individuals through hostile immigration policies extends to family members and the communities that they are part of; notes that the UK has one of the most complex and expensive routes to regularisation in Europe; further notes that all current routes to regularisation and settlement are far too long, complicated and inflexible, leaving people with no options but to live undocumented; understands that migrants who do not have access to the public safety net or the right to work are vulnerable to exploitation and; and calls on the Government to support recommendations made by Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants in its report, We Are Here: routes to regularisation for the UK’s undocumented population, published in April 2021 by introducing new routes to regularisation and removing barriers which cause migrants to become undocumented.

https://edm.parliament.uk/early-day-motion/58432

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Open Letter(2) to the Prime Minister of the UK and the Taoiseach of Ireland

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25th March 2021 

Dear Sirs

RE: ACCESS TO HEALTHCARE, HOUSING AND FOOD FOR ALL

On March 27th 2020 we called upon the British and Irish States to act immediately so that all undocumented, destitute and migrant people in the legal process in both the UK and Ireland are granted Status Now, as in Leave to Remain.  (Copy enclosed)

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The Status Now 4 All Calling Card for All Communities of Faith

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“Not having my status limits my joy, my happiness, nothing makes me excited. People take advantage.

I cannot even work. The pain is terrible. Terrible. People cry at night. There are suicides. 

In limbo, I cannot do anything I want to do, and I don’t know what is going to happen to me.

Locked down all the time, not just now. Let us have a chance.”

(Voices of people without status)

Who we are: The Status Now Network is a unique coalition of almost 130 organisations and community action groups, alongside individuals, who are campaigning for Status Now 4 All.  Our member organisations are listed on our website:   https://statusnow4all.org

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Status Now 4 All – this is our call

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27 March 2020 An Open Letter to the Prime Minister of the UK and the Taoiseach of Ireland

We call upon the British and Irish States to act immediately so that all undocumented, destitute and migrant people in the legal process in both the UK and Ireland are granted Status Now, as in *Indefinite Leave to Remain. In this way every human, irrespective of their nationality or citizenship can access healthcare, housing, food and the same sources of income from the State as everyone else.

[*The word ‘Indefinite’ was added to the call in our second letter, dated 27 March 2021: https://statusnow4all.org/open-letter2-to-the-prime-minister-of-the-uk-and-the-taoiseach-of-ireland/]

This is the letter in full below – we have not yet received an answer:

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Reckless ‘New Plan for Immigration’

We will collate reports of the Nationality & Borders Bill which has come out of the recent ‘New Plan for Immigration’; and reports related to Home Office practice.


8 December 2021 update: Migrant Voice  Deeply disappointing to see the inhumane and draconian Nationality & #BordersBill pass Commons 298 to 231 today. The bill violates and undermines international protection laws, puts lives at risk and criminalises seeking protection. #HostileEnvironment


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EU Borders and beyond

5 December 2021: SNN signatory Freedom United: Investigation points to E.U. complicity in deplorable treatment of migrants in Libya

A senior official at Frontex, who chose to remain anonymous, told Urbina that the agency also streams surveillance footage to the Italian Coast Guard and Italy’s Maritime Rescue Coordination Center. The Coast Guard intercepts the boats, and takes their passengers to centers like Al Mabani.  

Enough is enough 

Freedom United has been denouncing the E.U.’s complicity in the unlawful detention, abuse, extortion and slavery of people on the move in Libya since 2017. The upcoming elections in Libya will likely lead to new negotiations on migration between the E.U. and Libya. Take the chance to send the E.U. a clear message ahead of the negotiations: supporting these crimes is not acceptable. Sign the petition today. 

Read more here: https://www.freedomunited.org/news/eu-migrants-libya/


CNN: Her dream to teach English in Japan ended with a lesson for the country

After overstaying her visa, Rathnayake was detained in Japan’s immigration system, where she died on March 6, 2021, at the age of 33.Rathnayake’s case made headlines in Japan and fueled debate over the treatment of foreigners in the country, where 27 immigration detainees have died since 1997, according to the Japan Lawyers Network for Refugees.Her death has also exposed the lack of transparency in a system where people can languish for years with no prospect of release — a system that her sisters are now campaigning to change.

Read more here: https://edition.cnn.com/2021/12/04/asia/japan-immigration-detention-wishma-death-hnk-intl-dst/index.html

The Power of Art

Updated 5 December 2021: “I own nothing” by Loraine Masiya Mponela: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lvf7IjQn9Jw&t=2s


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EVENT: Life Seekers Aid Art Exhibition – 6 November 2021, London. The Exhibition runs on the 7th,8th, 9th, 10th, 11th & 12th November 4pm – 9pm.

Life Seekers Aid (LSA) grew out of the Camp Residents of Penally – CRoP organisation, which has been a signatory to StatusNow. They would now like to invite you to ‘The Penally Camp Exhibition’. We will be showcasing the amazing artwork of Asylum Seekers and Refugees who were accommodated at the MoD Facility in Wales. 

We are exhibiting artworks from artists who were present at the camp, the creation of which served as a lifeline and means of expression for people whose voices were being stifled. The works tell a human story of their journey, their homelands and the prosecution they have suffered along the way. They also tell of their continued mistreatment at the hands of the Home Office/The Far-Right. 

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Migration and COP26

The UK hosted the 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26) in Glasgow on 31 October – 12 November 2021

2 December 2021: It is our emissions that are causing migration. Can we please stop ill-treating migrants by Cryton Chikoko

The carbon footprint of the world’s richest 1% is on track to be 30 times higher than what is needed to limit global warming to 1.5C by 2030. While emissions of the poorest 50% will continue to be below climate goals, a recent study found out.  

Global warming is hugely caused by human activities of the Global North but the consequences are felt the most in the Global South. It is the poorest and most marginalised populations least responsible for climate change who are most exposed to its negative effects, more susceptible to damage and have the least resources to respond, adapt, recover and are hit the hardest by measures to combat the climate crisis.

Compare the carbon footprints of Masauko from Malawi and a typical British family:

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Sign on: Survivors voices inclusivity letter

Rhetta Moran of StatusNow writes about the post below: What struck me was the assertion and insistence of inclusivity of its message – it is for EVERYONE who has survived with lived experience of force, fraud, or coercion in the sex trades or other forms of labour. Just as we are for EVERYONE with precarious status in the UK and Ireland.

From new SNN signatory Freedom United : 26 October 2021: Sign on: Survivors voices inclusivity letter

With permission from the survivor-led, grassroots organizers of this open letter, Freedom United is sharing the text of the letter below. Freedom United has signed this letter and we encourage our global community to sign in support.

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Channel Crossings

Events and petitions below:

Updated 2 December 2021: BBC: Channel migrants: Pushing back boats will increase danger, MPs warn

UK plans to turn back people attempting to cross the Channel are dangerous and probably unlawful, MPs have warned.

Home Secretary Priti Patel said last week the tactic would help deter smuggling gangs, following the deaths of 27 people in a small boat.

The Joint Committee on Human Rights is urging Ms Patel to scrap the policy. [see below]

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Event on 4 December 2021: Poetry and Settled Status for All: Readings and Conversation

The 8th annual Leicester Human Rights Arts and Film Festival invites you to Poetry and Settled Status for All: Readings and Conversation, an online evening featuring poems and short prose exploring themes that include:

  • migrant, undocumented migrant and refugee experiences
  • the hostile environment, and
  • how, around the world, people are calling on governments to give Settled Status, Indefinite Leave to Remain or citizenship to all who need it.

The event takes place online on Saturday, 4 December 2021, from 6pm till 7.30pm.

Book your ticket here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/poetry-and-settled-status-for-all-readings-and-conversation-tickets-214818908137

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AT and WITHIN the UK’s Borders: StatusNow4All identifies with everyone in transit and everyone who has died in transit

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Status Now Statement: AT and WITHIN the UK’s Borders: StatusNow4All identifies with everyone in transit and everyone who has died in transit.
People have moved around the world for many reasons through time, and they still do. In their attempts to reach what they perceived to be a toehold where they and their families might begin to become safe, consider how many of these people have died because obstacles have been put in their way on land or in the water.  We don’t know the numbers. 

We do know that the overt and systematic militarisation of the European Union borders began in 2004 when Frontex (funded through the European Commission) were contracted.

In July 2021 a condemnation of Frontex’s actions failing to protect asylum seekers rights was published.

Now, in the wake of the most recent drownings in the English Channel, networks up and down Britain are mobilising to communicate their complete condemnation of the Government’s immigration control systems, AT and WITHIN the UK’s borders. Every time people plan and work together through such mobilisations, we strengthen the bonds committed to transforming the way the migration system works and stopping the deaths and the suffering.

We must achieve this transformation. 

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STATUS NOW 4 ALL – MIDLANDS: Join us online as we commemorate this year’s International Migrants Day 2021 #IMD2021

StatusNow4All Midlands

STATUS NOW 4 ALL – MIDLANDS: Join us online as we commemorate this year’s International Migrants Day 2021 #IMD2021 This is an online event.

Date: 18th December 2021: Time 1-2PM.

This event is organised by Status Now 4 All signatories based in the Midlands as part of the International Migrants Day 2021. Among other speakers, we will hear from a number of organisations signatories about why they support the Status Now 4 All campaign, how you or your organisation too can be part, and why this campaign is important for all of us. There will also be creative performances.

Further details will be added later.

Please book your Eventbrite ticket here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/status-now-4-all-midlands-international-migrants-day-celebration-event-tickets-217867456427

ICIBI: Second annual inspection of ‘Adults at risk in immigration detention’

This report from ICIBI links well to the report of 24 November 2021: BBC – Brook House detention centre whistleblower ‘abuse’ inquiry begins – see that and other information about the Brook House Inquiry below

21 October 2021: Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration – ICIBI Report Published: Second Annual Inspection of ‘Adults at risk in immigration detention’ July 2020 to March 2021

This inspection found that work to address shortcomings in the Home Office’s policy and procedures for identifying and safeguarding vulnerable detainees was moving at an unacceptably slow pace. Though seven of the eight recommendations made in ICIBI’s first annual inspection were accepted in full or in part, none of these had been closed by January 2021.

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The immigration detention estate for women

Updated 23 November 2021: Re: Hassockfield/Consett/Derwentside immigration detention centre to house women will open by the end of 2021!

iNews: As migrant channel crossings hit a new record, insiders says centres like Yarl’s Wood can never be humane

For 20 years, Yarl’s Wood has been holding asylum seekers without time limits. Now a controversial new centre is replacing it to hold women. Is it time to call an end to detention?

Agnes Tanoh still remembers the fear of being taken into Yarl’s Wood, nearly a decade on. “You walk through the gates,” says the 65-year-old Ivorian refugee, “and the tunnel you take to reach the first office destroys your mind. I thought, ‘I am going somewhere I may never leave.’”

It was March 2012 when Tanoh was arrested and taken to the notorious immigration detention centre in Bedfordshire. After the disturbing ordeal of fleeing her home country the previous year, with her life at risk, she was incarcerated indefinitely as she awaited news of her fate.

“You haven’t defended yourself at trial,” she explains. “Being taken to a detention centre is being given a sentence without a time limit. It can be one week, three months, one year – you don’t know. Detention breaks families and causes distress and trauma.”

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Barriers to Wellbeing

Updated 23 November 2021: Guardian: System for assessing who must pay for NHS care ‘incentivises racial profiling’

Study criticises stringent charging regime introduced by NHS England over the past decade

The system for assessing who should be asked to pay for NHS services “incentivises racial profiling”, an investigation has found.

A study by the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) found that overstretched NHS staff sometimes racially profiled patients in order to determine who was not “ordinarily resident” in the UK, and therefore must pay for their care.

The report is critical of the more stringent charging regime introduced by NHS England over the past decade as part of a series of measures devised to create a hostile environment for people living in the UK without the correct immigration status. NHS trusts have appointed overseas visitors officers, responsible for identifying chargeable patients, as part of a cost recovery programme launched in 2014.

One of the officers told the IPPR study they had felt forced to discriminate between patients based on their name. “If you’ve got a, I don’t know, Mohammed Khan and a Fred Cooper, you’re obviously going to go for [investigating] the Mohammed Khan … Even for someone who’s, you know, well I’d like to think hopefully open-minded, like myself, you’re just trying to save yourself time because there’s not enough hours in the day,” the officer said.

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